So my neighbors started composting

So I guess I'm a composting now? Here's what I've learned

So my neighbors started composting and lucky for me they created a VERY large composting box..which means it’s time to take my recycling and earth-friendly habits to the next level.

To be honest, when they first told me that this box was being created, I didn’t know much about composting. I mean, I knew it cut down on garbage/waste and helped with growing a garden, but that’s kind of sad, basic information, right? After a quick google search I can formally share that “Composting is the transformation of organic material (plant matter) through decomposition into a soil-like material called compost”.

Okay, so how do you do it?

You start by getting yourself a composting bin. My neighbors took care of this for us by making one out of pallets. You can also choose to follow the DIY route, or you can buy one. Then you just start filling it up!

Different websites take different approaches. Some are very methodical (think layering different kind of organic material and putting leaves through a paper shredder), others are a little more natural. We’re heading down that second road, throwing in various items as they become available and taking care of the pile as we go.  The big thing to remember of course, is that the point is for this organic material to break down and create this nutrient-rich soil or compost. As we all know, all waste is not created equal and therefore all waste can not just be tossed in your bin.

Here is a quick list of organic materials you can add:

  • Leaves/grass
  • Fruit and veggies
  • Coffee grinds/filters
  • Tea bags
  • Egg shells
  • Garden soil
  • Newspaper (with no color print)
  • Saw dust
  • Soil
  • Herbivorous animal waste (no meat eaters, please!)

Things you can NOT add:

  • Pet waste
  • Meat scraps/bones
  • Disposable diapers
  • Plastic
  • Synthetic fibers
  • Dead plants
  • Anything with dairy

I also learned that it’s a good idea to keep a healthy mix of the “yes” items above. Most things that I read split this list up into two categories: Green and Brown materials. They break down in different ways and produce different materials. It’s a good idea to water and turn your pile regularly, to keep air flow and discourage any foul odors.

To be honest I’m a little nervous about this endeavor. South Florida is known for an early summer and I’m just going to guess that heat and humidity probably play a rather smelly part in decomposition… sooo wish us luck! If you have tips, please leave them in the comments.. I’m sure I’m going to need them.

 

Photo via ManMade

2 Comments

  1. Ooo good luck! My parents compost with the second method too and theirs seems to be going fine, but they also have a big yard with a far corner to keep all of the smells 😉 I get in trouble basically every time I go over for putting something incorrect in the garbage or the composting pile so your list is definitely helpful!

    Kristina does the Internets

  2. Great post.Thanks for sharing different methods of composting.I have been tried first one and that worked for me pretty good.I will try second method next time.Composting is the best way to get over from waste material and reuse it for something better.

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